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Where Jesus Goes

Luke 18:31-43

Rev. Kurt Hering

Quinquagesima
Trinity Lutheran Church  
Layton, Utah

Play MP3 of this sermon

Sun, Mar 2, 2014 

Preaching to the saints of the Lutheran Church at Christ-Elkhart and Faith-Hugoton in Kansas since February 8, 2015. All sermons prior to that date were preached either at Trinity Lutheran Church-Layton or First Lutheran Church-Tooele, Utah.

In going up to Jerusalem and the cross, Jesus never loses sight of those He meets on His way. And neither should we—either in how we treat our neighbor, or in regard to the faith that he provides for us and our loved ones in our times of need here.

That is something for us not only to keep in mind for our comfort and confidence, but for our daily, work-a-day lives as well--lest we go through life like the rich man who had no time for Lazarus.

You see, as His baptized children, you are each members of the body of Christ today. And that means where you go, Jesus goes to save and heal.

To hear the entire sermon preached for Quniquagesima, "Where Jesus Goes," click on the MP3 audio link provided above. The audio begins with the Old Testament reading, 1 Samuel 16:1–13. The sermon begins at the 14:41 of the mp3 file.

A servant of the Word and His folk,

Pastor Hering

For those of you who prefer to read or read along while listening, the preaching manuscript follows below.

Nota bene: Sermons are meant to be heard. Some points from the manuscript are explained and filled out during the preaching, so you will need to listen to the audio file to get the full message.

TEXT: 35[On the way up to Jerusalem with His disciples,] as he was come nigh unto Jericho, a certain blind man sat by the wayside begging. 36And hearing the multitude pass by, [the blind man] asked what it meant. 37And they told him, that Jesus of Nazareth passeth by. 38And he cried [out], saying, “Jesus, thou Son of David, have mercy on me.!” 39And they which went before rebuked him, that he should hold his peace: but he cried out so much the more, “Thou Son of David, have mercy on me.” 40And Jesus stood, and commanded him to be brought to him: and when he was come near, he asked him saying, 41“What wilt thou that I should do unto thee?” And he said, “Lord, that I may receive my sight.” 42And Jesus said unto him, “Receive thy sight; thy faith hath saved thee.” 43And immediately he received his sight, and followed him, glorifying God: and all the people, when they saw it, gave praise unto God. Luke 18:31-42 [Luther's translation in English]

Dear Baptized Children of God:

Apart from the these, thys, and thous, did you notice the difference between Luther’s version and the ESV version in the readings of our Gospel account for today?

According to Luther, Jesus tells the anonymous blind man, “Receive thy sight; thy faith hath saved thee.” According to the ESV, and most other translations other than the KJV, Jesus says, “Recover your sight; your faith has made you well [or, healed you].”

The Greek word, σεσωκεν [sotso], can be understood either way depending upon context. Or, perhaps it would be even better to say, it comprehends and encompasses both. And that is the point I would like us to take home with us today.

Where Jesus goes, Jesus heals and saves—saves and heals.

The first part of our Gospel speaks especially about the saving; the second portion of Jesus encounter with the blind man speaks of the healing.

To Jerusalem to save from sin. Deliverance from death to life.

Through Jericho to heal a blind man. Deliverance from sickness to health.

We have this idea of sin and forgiveness that it is merely about offense. Of course it is that. But we seem to have lost sight of the fact that “the wages of sin is death.”

And that salvation is not just forgiveness as God’s feeling toward us, but it is “the free gift of God [of] eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.” Romans 6:23

Both the saving and the healing are to be received in faith—else no healing or saving.

But both are about deliverance.

• Saving: From sin to righteousness and holiness

• Healing: From disease to wholeness and wellness

What becomes clear today in placing these two seemingly separate issues and concepts of saving and healing side by side, is that they really are the same thing—and Where Jesus goes He goes to save and heal.

• Saving and healing both are a matter of taking person out of a bad condition and making them to be in a good condition—the condition in which they were first created to be in the beginning.

• Saving the world is not a bigger, more important thing than healing one person. And healing one person is no smaller, less important a thing than saving the world.

Not to God anyway.

And so we see today that God sends His Son to do both and that they are ultimately the same one thing—the same one thing that

• begins in Baptism as

• and is fully realized on the Last Day of Resurrection.

In going up to Jerusalem and the cross, Jesus never loses sight of those He meets on His way. And neither should we—either in how we treat our neighbor or in regard to our faith that he provides for us and our loved ones in our time of need here.

That is something for us not only to keep in mind for our comfort and confidence, but for our lives as well, lest we go through life like the rich man who had no time for Lazarus.

You see, you are each members of the body of Christ today. And that means where you go, Jesus goes to save and heal.

How? Only God knows for sure. But certainly He will and does heal and save through the life of His church—which includes your prayers and fasting and alms giving and your vocations by which you serve your neighbor and your bringing the good news to them and them to the good news. Not that you boast of these things, or even look to them for proof of your salvation. But that you rejoice knowing that where you go, what God has worked in you He is now using you to work in others—like Alexa, and Margaret, and Pastor Chambers, etc.

Where Jesus goes, Jesus heals and saves—saves and heals. For Jesus means, “I am salvation,” i.e. saving, which also means, “I Am healing.” Saving and healing is what He does wherever He goes because saving and healing is who He is wherever He goes. That healing and saving is here for you to both receive and take on your way today, and every day, and forever—in the name of the Father, and of the + Son, and of the Holy Spirit.



Insofar as this sermon is a true proclamation of the Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ, it belongs to Him and His Church. Therefore its use is free to all who deem it worthy and beneficial.



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