Welcome


Take a Survey


Help support this site:


Sermon List
Search
About

Login or Register

Luther Sayings

Terms of Use

YAAG
(lectionary)

Newsletter Articles or other writings

BOC readings - 3 year

BOC readings - 1 year

Bible in One Year

Bible in Two Years

5 mins with Luther














Pericope

Sermon List       Other sermons by Rev Hering       Notify me when Rev Hering posts sermons
      RSS feed for Rev Hering       RSS feed for all sermons

I Will Be Healed

Matthew 9:18-26

Rev. Kurt Hering

Twenty-Fourth Sunday after Trinity
Trinity Lutheran Church  
Layton, Utah

Play MP3 of this sermon

Sun, Nov 10, 2013 

Preaching to the saints of the Lutheran Church at Christ-Elkhart and Faith-Hugoton in Kansas since February 8, 2015. All sermons prior to that date were preached either at Trinity Lutheran Church-Layton or First Lutheran Church-Tooele, Utah.

Having been brought to faith, the temptation to think too highly of ourselves remains, and can even be heightened as we experience those good works Christ is doing through us--perhaps even having family and friends looking to us as examples of faith. That is all well and good, that others look to us. But woe to us if we look unto ourselves and brag on ourselves, even if it is our faith of which we are bragging.

. . . Christianity, the faith that saves, is all about Christ—first, last, and always--what He has done for us in His suffering and death; and what He continues to do for us by His resurrection and ascension to the right hand of the Father whence He sends His Holy Spirit to deliver you into the faith by which you too, with the suffering woman can say, “I will be made well.”

Jesus tells the woman, “your faith has made you well.” But if you were to ask Jairus, or the woman, or Jairus’s little daughter they would tell you it was Jesus who made them well, because their faith was in Jesus to do what He does—save.

To hear the entire sermon preached for the Twenty-Fourth Sunday after Trinity, "I Will be Healed," click on the MP3 audio link provided above. The audio begins with the Old Testament reading from Isaiah 51:9-16. The sermon begins at the 14:23 point of the mp3 file.

A servant of the Word and His folk,

Pastor Hering

For those of you who prefer to read or read along while listening, the preaching manuscript follows below.

Nota bene: Sermons are meant to be heard. Some points from the manuscript are explained and filled out during the preaching, so you will need to listen to the audio file to get the full message.

TEXT: . And behold, a woman who had suffered from a discharge of blood for twelve years came up behind him and touched the fringe of his garment, for she said to herself, “If I only touch his garment, I will be made well.” Matthew 9:20-21

Dear people of faith,

“I will be made well.” This is the language of saving faith, the language of powerful prayer, the language of true worship.

What a gift you have—this thing called faith. And make no mistake about it, faith is a gift . For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast. Ephesians 2:8-9

True enough, Jesus goes so far as to say the woman’s faith has made her well. But what is this thing Jesus calls faith that it has such power?

The woman, as well as the other two principle characters with whom Jesus interacts in our Gospel text each can teach us something most important about faith.

18While [Jesus] was saying these things to them, behold, a ruler came in and knelt before him, saying, “My daughter has just died, but come and lay your hand on her, and she will live.” 19And Jesus rose and followed him, with his disciples.

Jairus—as synagogue ruler, is helpless to save his own daughter. Influential. Man of God. Resources to enlist the best care. His peers hold Jesus in contempt. Swallows his pride and comes to Jesus, bowing at His feet.

20And behold, a woman who had suffered from a discharge of blood for twelve years came up behind him and touched the fringe of his garment, 21for she said to herself, “If I only touch his garment, I will be made well.” 22Jesus turned, and seeing her he said, “Take heart, daughter; your faith has made you well.” And instantly the woman was made well.

The woman with the flow of blood—12 years of suffering. Outcast of sorts. Exhausted all her resources. Considers herself unworthy and comes to Jesus, cowering in His trail to but touch the hem of His clothes.

23And when Jesus came to the ruler’s house and saw the flute players and the crowd making a commotion, 24he said, “Go away, for the girl is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. 25But when the crowd had been put outside, he went in and took her by the hand, and the girl arose. 26And the report of this went through all that district.

A little girl, daughter of affluence and influence in church and culture—dead. Capable of nothing. Rises amidst the jeers of the crowd.

And when the Pharisees saw this, they said to his disciples, "Why does your teacher eat with tax collectors and sinners?" But when he heard it, he said, "Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. . . .  For I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance."

We have no shortage of Pharisees today—Bible thumpers who look down on those sinful folk out there that need to be saved to be holy like us; prosperity preachers who measure and guarantee faith by worldly health and wealth. 

So this last is the best illustration of faith and our sinful condition. Jesus shows why he consorts with sinners. And at the same time He answers the age old question of those who wonder why a loving God allows bad things to happen--especially to God’s people.

Well first of all, like Jairus and the woman, until we come to the realization that nothing we can do will cure what ails us or our loved ones--until we despair of our worldly and human resources—we are not ready to come to Christ with faith that trusts in Him and Him alone apart from any work that we might contribute to the cause.

This is the purpose of the curse of the Law, that we be emptied of any faith in self and what is inside of us. Only then, when we are convinced and feel the need for God’s grace are we prepared to receive it. Saving faith looks inside, and finding nothing left on which to depend, looks up to Christ—like Jairus bowing down at the Savior’s feet and the woman bending to touch the hem of His garment.

Having been brought to faith, the temptation to think too highly of ourselves remains and can even be heightened as we experience those good works Christ is doing through us--perhaps even having family and friends looking to us as examples of faith. That is all well and good, that others look to us. But woe to us of we look unto ourselves and brag on ourselves, even if it is our faith of which we are bragging. 

So to keep me from becoming conceited because of the surpassing greatness of the revelations, a thorn was given me in the flesh, a messenger of Satan to harass me, to keep me from becoming conceited. Three times I pleaded with the Lord about this, that it should leave me. But he said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” Therefore I will boast all the more gladly of my weaknesses, so that the power of Christ may rest upon me. For the sake of Christ, then, I am content with weaknesses, insults, hardships, persecutions, and calamities. For when I am weak, then I am strong. 2 Corinthians 12:7-10

And that is faith—at least the Christian faith. As we see in Luther’s sermon for this text, “It takes much more to be a Christian than to be pious. A person can easily be pious, but not a Christian. A Christian knows nothing to say about his piety, for he finds in himself nothing good or pious. . . . So one is not called a Christian because he does much, but because he receives something from Christ, draws from him and lets Christ only give to him. . . . If you look at what you do, you have already lost the Christian name. . . . Therefore, if you wish to consider the word in its true meaning, you must identify a Christian by the fact that he only receives something from Christ, and has Christ within him; for this is what the word properly means.”

Christianity, the faith that saves, is all about Christ—first, last, and always--what He has done for us in His suffering and death; and what He continues to do for us by His resurrection and ascension to the right hand of the Father whence He sends His Holy Spirit to deliver you into the faith by which you too, with the suffering woman can say, “I will be made well.”

Jesus tells the woman, “your faith has made you well.” But if you were to ask Jairus, or the woman, or Jairus’s little daughter they would tell you it was Jesus who made them well, because their faith was in Jesus to do what He does—save.

Dear people of faith, let the suffering woman’s words be your words of confession and prayer. “I will be made well.” In holy Baptism, He has brought you from death to life. By the preaching of His Word, he has drawn you out of the affluence and influence of the world to repent and receive forgiveness for your sinful pride and self reliance. Whenever you come to the Lord’s house and hear the Invocation and Benediction; whenever you make the sign of the cross to begin your prayers—in the name of the Father, and of the + Son, and of the Holy Spirit—“I will be made well” is the very essence and truth of that which follows.

Holy Communion is Christ’s seal and proof of that. You do not have to settle for the hem of His robe, but receive His very body and blood to strengthen and preserve you in body and soul until the day when your body and blood will be raised to be like his.

So “take heart, and arise.” Your Savior is making you well so that, in the words of the apostle Paul in today’s epistle, you may be strengthened with all power, according to his glorious might, for all endurance and patience with joy, giving thanks to the Father, who has qualified you to share in the inheritance of the saints in light. He has delivered us from the domain of darkness and transferred us to the kingdom of his beloved Son, in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins----in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.



Insofar as this sermon is a true proclamation of the Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ, it belongs to Him and His Church. Therefore its use is free to all who deem it worthy and beneficial.



Send Rev. Kurt Hering an email.




Unique Visitors: